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Making Waves: Media's Potential for Girls in the Global South

November 3, 2014

There are around 600 million adolescent girls living in developing countries. Doubly marginalised because oftheir gender and age, many live a bleak existence -- excluded from access to basic public services, unable to shape the decisions that affect their lives and vulnerable to violence at home and on the street. Their voices often go unheard.Slowly, this is beginning to change. Over the past two decades girls have become a growing priority for the international development community. Investing in their health education and employment prospects is nowwidely considered to have an important ripple effect on other development outcomes such as economic growth and social equality. As a result, development assistance programmes that support girls' empowerment are now seen by many as not just the "right" thing to do, but a necessity Less well understood is where media fits into this equation The interplay between media and gender norms has long been recognised and a substantial literature explores how media affects girls in the Global North But against a backdrop of rapidly changing media landscapes -- characterised by increasing competition for audiences sensationalism and expanding access to new technologies -- the role that media plays in girls' lives in the Global South demands further examination.Drawing on expert interviews as well as insights from the media and development literature, this policy briefing seeks to fill this gap. It argues that media -- whether traditional or online -- matters a great deal in the lives of girls in the developing world. It matters because it has the ability to be harmful to girls' interests and self-esteem, and it matters because it can also be so effective in playing a positive role in girls' lives. Specifically, media can influence girls' aspirations and behaviours around their health and livelihoods open the door to greater participation in society and ensure that girls' issues move higher up the public agenda. If challenges around media access and control and the extent to which media organisations value girls as part of their audience, are addressed head on, media can play a vital role in helping to advance the wellbeing of adolescent girls in regions of the world where their interests have traditionally been most neglected.

Mapping Digital Media: Guatemala

January 1, 2014

The Mapping Digital Media project examines the global opportunities and risks created by the transition from traditional to digital media. Covering 60 countries, the project examines how these changes affect the core democratic service that any media system should provide: news about political, economic, and social affairs.Guatemala is a relatively young democracy plagued by high levels of violent crime, corruption, and wealth inequality, with poverty concentrated in rural areas and among indigenous populations. It has one of the highest rates of illiteracy in the region, with a quarter of all adults unable to read.These problems are not likely to be solved by digital and social media any time soon. However, as new technologies of communication spread among a youthful population, they are likely to play an increasing role in shaping citizenry and promoting social change.This report puts forward a set of policy recommendations to improve transparency and accountability in digital media policy; to support and promote community and minority expression in the new media landscape; to institute public service media; to bridge the digital divide; and to improve the collection, monitoring, and analysis of media consumption data and trends.

Mapping Digital Media: Guatemala - Spanish

January 1, 2014

The Mapping Digital Media project examines the global opportunities and risks created by the transition from traditional to digital media. Covering 60 countries, the project examines how these changes affect the core democratic service that any media system should provide: news about political, economic, and social affairs.Guatemala is a relatively young democracy plagued by high levels of violent crime, corruption, and wealth inequality, with poverty concentrated in rural areas and among indigenous populations. It has one of the highest rates of illiteracy in the region, with a quarter of all adults unable to read.These problems are not likely to be solved by digital and social media any time soon. However, as new technologies of communication spread among a youthful population, they are likely to play an increasing role in shaping citizenry and promoting social change.This report puts forward a set of policy recommendations to improve transparency and accountability in digital media policy; to support and promote community and minority expression in the new media landscape; to institute public service media; to bridge the digital divide; and to improve the collection, monitoring, and analysis of media consumption data and trends.

Killing the News: Stories Go Untold as Latin American Journalists Die

October 29, 2010

Describes the rise in murders of journalists and insufficient government action. Examines the activities of the Inter American Press Association's Knight-funded Impunity Project to investigate the murders and call for the protection of freedom of speech.

The Impunity Project of the Inter American Press Association: Final Summary Report 2003-2006

November 30, 2006

Evaluates the impact of the initiative's rapid response unit, which investigates attacks and provides legal assistance; advertising campaign to make cases visible; and training program to prevent future attacks. Includes case summaries.

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